“Égalité for All: Toussaint L’Overture and the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804)” – Full PBS Documentary, 55 min, 2009, HD

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“It was the only successful slave insurrection in history. It grasped the full meaning of French revolutionary ideas — liberté, equalité, fraternité — and used them to create the world’s first Black republic. It changed the trajectory of colonial economics. “It” was the Haitian Revolution, a movement that’s been called the true birth moment of universal human rights. Vaguely remembered today, the Haitian Revolution was a hurricane at the turn of the nineteenth century — traumatizing Southern planters and inspiring slaves and abolitionists, worldwide.

The man at the forefront of Haiti’s epochal uprising was Toussaint Louverture. He was world-known in his day and deserves a place among history’s most celebrated figures today. Born into slavery, Toussaint had been freed by his master before the revolt began. He owned property and was financially secure. He risked it all, however, to join then lead an army of slaves that would fight, in turn, the French, the British, and the Spanish empires for twelve years…

The story of Haiti’s revolution is a story of extraordinary pathos. Half a million slaves dared hope for an unprecedented end to slavery and thousands died in the process. But the revolution’s history is also a story of forgotten people and milestones. Haitian slaves did not just fight with weapons. In 1794 a multi-racial delegation from Haiti traveled to Paris to address the national assembly. They spoke powerfully about slavery’s moral and physical violence. They argued that their struggle was part of France’s domestic revolution against despotism. And they won the day. The elocution of Haitian Blacks led to a sudden decree that not only freed the empire’s entire slave population, it made them French citizens, too.

Égalité for All: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution explores this history through music, voodoo ritual, powerful re-creations, and insightful writers and historians.” – PBS Synopsis

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You might also like:

Haitian Revolution – Toussaint L’Overture on Vimeo.

Toussaint L’Ouverture was the leader of the Haitian Revolution (1794-1804) against the French. Haiti was the first black republic and the second independent modern nation in the Western Hemisphere. Through the illustrations of paintings by Jacob Lawrence and Edouard Duval-Carrie, among others, the re-enactment of the lasts days of Toussaint L’Ouverture and the story of the Haitian Revolution unfolds. This film features actors Danny Glover as narrator and Glenn Plummer in the role of Toussaint, interviews with Dr. Cornel West and Wyclef Jean (who also composed original music). Created for the Museum of the African Diaspora. All rights and permissions belong to the museum.

One thought on ““Égalité for All: Toussaint L’Overture and the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804)” – Full PBS Documentary, 55 min, 2009, HD

  1. Pingback: “EXAMINED LIFE – PHILOSOPHY IS IN THE STREETS” (awesome doc!) | A W E S T R U C K _W A N D E R E R

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