JOAN BAEZ: “Arguably the world’s most famous female folk singer, known for her distinctive, sweeping soprano and her accomplished interpretive skills.”


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Joan sings The Beatles, “Let It Be”:

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Martin

1966: Martin Luther King and singer Joan Baez marching to the Grenada, Mississippi school that was being integrated. Baez supported the effort financially. ©1976 Bob Fitch/Take Stock / The Image Works.

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jOAN bAEZ

From Chris Strodder’s “The Encyclopedia of Sixties Cool”

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Joan and Bob, together,
(listen to her album of Dylan songs):
Dylan
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OTHER FULL ALBUMS:


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FULL CONCERTS


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c2c48a3c8e26b46edd5d642e65d08e54 Joan sings some classic Marley ragga…

And why not trip on with caliente Cuban
“Guantanamera!”

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Poster
Artist Biography by William Ruhlmann

tumblr_nhk9fy01Yo1rzligdo1_500Joan Baez – The most accomplished interpretive folksinger of the 1960s, Joan Baez has influenced nearly every aspect of popular music in a career still going strong. Baez is possessed of a once-in-a-lifetime soprano, which, since the late ’50s, she has put in the service of folk and pop music as well as a variety of political causes. Starting out in Boston, Baez first gained recognition at the 1959 Newport Folk Festival, then cut her debut album, Joan Baez (October 1960), for Vanguard Records. It was made up of 13 traditional songs, some of them children’s ballads, given near-definitive treatment. A moderate success on release, the album took off after the breakthrough of Joan Baez, Vol. 2 (September 1961), and both albums became huge hits, as did Baez’s third album, Joan Baez in Concert, Pt. 1 (September 1962). Each album went gold and stayed in the bestseller charts more than two years.

Joan Baez in Concert, Pt. 2 From 1962 to 1964, Baez was the popular face of folk music, headlining festivals and concert tours and singing at political events, including the August 1963 March on Washington. During this period, she began to champion the work of folk songwriter Bob Dylan, and gradually her repertoire moved from traditional material toward the socially conscious work of the emerging generation of ’60s artists like him. Her albums of this period were Joan Baez in Concert, Pt. 2 (November 1963) and Joan Baez 5 (October 1964), which contained her cover of Phil Ochs’ “There But for Fortune,” a Top Ten hit in the U.K.

Farewell, Angelina Like other popular folk performers, Baez was affected by the changes in popular music wrought by the appearance of the Beatles in the U.S. in 1964 and Dylan’s introduction of folk-rock in 1965, and she began to augment her simple acoustic guitar backing with other instruments, initially on Farewell, Angelina (October 1965). It was followed by a Christmas album, Noël (October 1966), and Joan (August 1967), albums on which she was accompanied by an orchestra conducted by Peter Schickele. Baez continued to experiment in the late ’60s, releasing Baptism (June 1968), in which she recited poetry, and Any Day Now (December 1968), a double album of Dylan songs done with country backing, which went gold… READ ON AT AMG ALL MUSIC GUIDE

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RECOMMENDED FURTHER READING:

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“In his study, Markus Jaeger explores the coalescence of Joan Baez’s work as a singer and songwriter with her endeavors as a political activist throughout the last fifty years. He illustrates an American popular singer’s significance as a political activist–for her audiences and for her opponents as well as for those victims of politically organized violence who have profited from her work. Mingling popular culture with political activism can be a helpful means to achieve non-violent societal progress. Joan Baez’s work offers an excellent example for this hypothesis.” DOWNLOAD EBOOK IN PDF FROM LIBGEN.ORG (230 pgs, 2010)

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Gran Finale:
BBC’s Imagine // Joan Baez

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Pete Seeger’s Rainbow Quest (1965–66) – TV series devoted to folk music [Watch Full Episodes]

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Pete Seeger, 1986

 

Rainbow Quest, perhaps not surprisingly, comes across as something like anti-TV TV, more about sitting back and letting Seeger and the visiting musicians take their own time to sing what they’ve got to sing and say what they’ve got to say than working too hard to maintain viewer interest, its awkwardly unplanned atmosphere both clunky and charming. Seeger seems to trust the viewers, in the same way he recognises that TV’s priorities don’t represent the priorities of the people he meets in his travels.

He speaks to the camera in that same natural, some might say dull, conversational tone that he uses in his concerts, simultaneously mundane and insightful. There’s something of ‘Mr Rogers’ in the experience: an attempt at a personal warmth through the cold screen; Rainbow Quest can seem like watching a children’s show that somehow bypasses all the boundaries between child and adult. Seeger is still one of the few great artists who seems more concerned about involving the audience in a sing-along than giving a distanced untouchable performance: a sharing of the music, in the best folk tradition.”

Kit McFarlane @ Pop Matters

Watch some full episodes of Seeger’s Rainbow Quest:







Joan Baez sings Bob Dylan (20 Songs – Full Album)

Joan Baez

Joan Baez – Vanguard Sessions – Baez Sings Dylan – 1998

01 Love Minus Zero-No Limit 0:00
02 It’s All over Now, Baby Blue. 2:43
03 You Ain’t Going Nowhere. 6:09
04 It Ain’t Me Babe. 9:11
05 I Pity the Poor Immigrant. 12:32
06 Tears of Rage. 16:20
07 Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word 20:44
08 I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine 25:12
09 Farewell, Angelina 28:29
10 Dear Landlord 31:45
11 One Too Many Mornings 34:46
12 I Shall Be Released 38:00
13 Boots of Spanish Leather 41:58
14 Daddy You’ve Been on My Mind 46:32
15 Restless Farewell 48:50
16 Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right 54:43
17 Walls of Red Wing 57:56
18 Drifter’s Escape 1:01:49
19 Walkin’ Down the Line 1:04:44
20 North Country Blues 1:08:08

Rarities of Folk-Rock and Psychedelia in the 60s: The Lovin’ Spoonful

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THE LOVIN’ SPOONFUL
The Hums of the Lovin’ Spoonful (1966)

One of the grooviest bands of the Greenwich Village scene in New York in the Sixties. The music is both deeply rooted in North-American traditions of folk music and bluegrass, and deeply contemporary – they sound like a band who could only be born out of Bob Dylan going electric to jam with The Band. White-boy soul and vocal harmonies whose beauty rivals with The Beach Boys or Neil Young are other attractions of The Lovin’ Spoonful sound. So here’s the band 3rd studio album for the enjoyment of any of you interested in undigging the buried treasures of American music:

Similar artists: The Monkees; The Byrds; Beau Brummels; The Kinks; Buffalo Springfield; CSN&Y; Donovan; Dave Von Ronk; Fred Neil; Lightnin’ Hopkins; John Lee Hooker.