“The revolution will put you in the driver’s seat.”

Gil

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”
by Gil-Scott Heron


You will not be able to stay home, brother.
You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out.
You will not be able to lose yourself on skag and
skip out for beer during commercials,
Because the revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by Xerox
In 4 parts without commercial interruptions.
The revolution will not show you pictures of Nixon
blowing a bugle and leading a charge by John
Mitchell, General Abrams and Mendel Rivers to eat
hog maws confiscated from a Harlem sanctuary.

The revolution will not be televised.
The revolution will not be brought to you by the
Schaefer Award Theatre and will not star Natalie
Woods and Steve McQueen or Bullwinkle and Julia.
The revolution will not give your mouth sex appeal.
The revolution will not get rid of the nubs.
The revolution will not make you look five pounds
thinner, the revolution will not be televised, Brother.

There will be no pictures of you and Willie Mays
pushing that shopping cart down the block on the dead run,
or trying to slide that color television into a stolen ambulance.
NBC will not be able predict the winner at 8:32
on reports from 29 districts.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no pictures of pigs shooting down
brothers in the instant replay.
There will be no pictures of Whitney Young being
run out of Harlem on a rail with a brand new process.
There will be no slow motion or still life of Roy
Wilkens strolling through Watts in a Red, Black and
Green liberation jumpsuit that he had been saving
For just the right occasion.

Green Acres, The Beverly Hillbillies, and Hooterville
Junction will no longer be so god damned relevant, and
women will not care if Dick finally screwed
Jane on Search for Tomorrow because Black people
will be in the street looking for a brighter day.
The revolution will not be televised.

There will be no highlights on the eleven o’clock
news and no pictures of hairy armed women
liberationists and Jackie Onassis blowing her nose.
The theme song will not be written by Jim Webb or
Francis Scott Key, nor sung by Glen Campbell, Tom
Jones, Johnny Cash or Englebert Humperdink.
The revolution will not be televised.

The revolution will not be right back
after a message about a white tornado, white lightning, or white people.
You will not have to worry about a dove in your
bedroom, a tiger in your tank, or the giant in your toilet bowl.
The revolution will not go better with Coke.
The revolution will not fight the germs that may cause bad breath.
The revolution will put you in the driver’s seat.

The revolution will not be televised, will not be televised,
will not be televised, will not be televised.
The revolution will be no re-run brothers;
The revolution will be live.

Wattstax Documents the “Black Woodstock” Concert Held 7 Years After the Watts Riots (1973)

Wattstax Picture Logokinopoisk.ru
By Josh Jones. Reblogged from Open Culture.

Recent events in Missouri have brought back painful memories for many of the brutal treatment of protestors by police during the Civil Rights Movement. Others see specters of the riots in cities like Detroit, Washington, DC, and the beleaguered Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles in the wake of Martin Luther King Jr.’s murder. These are battles we would like to think belong to the past, but in remembering them, we should also remember peaceful expressions of solidarity and nonviolent responses to persistent social injustice. One such response came in the form of a massive concert at the L.A. Coliseum put on by Memphis’ Stax records in 1972, seven years after the Watts riots. Featuring some of Stax’ biggest names— Isaac Hayes, Albert King, The Staples Singers, and more — the Wattstax music festival brought in more than 100,000 attendees and raised thousands of dollars for local causes, becoming known informally as the “black Woodstock.”

The idea came from West Coast Stax exec Forrest Hamilton and future Stax president Al Bell, who hoped, he said, to “put on a small concert to help draw attention to, and to raise funds for the Watts Summer Festival” as well as “to create, motivate, and instill a sense of pride in the citizens of the Watts community.” To make sure everyone could attend, rich or poor, the organizers sold tickets for a dollar each. Rev. Jesse Jackson gave the invocation, leading the thousands of concertgoers in a call-and-response reading of William H. Borders’ poem “I Am – Somebody.” There to film the event was Mel Stuart, director of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. The resulting documentary features incredible performances from Stax’ full roster of artists at the time (see a swaggering Isaac Hayes play “Shaft”). Despite security concerns from LA officials, still nervous about a gathering of “more than two black people” in one place, says Bell, the concert was a peaceful and joyously funky occasion: “you saw the Crips and Bloods sitting side by side—no problems.”

The film intercuts concert footage with man-on-the street interviews and “trenchant musings” from a then little-known Richard Pryor, who offers “sharp insight into the realities of life for black Americans, circa 1972.” It’s a moment of “get-down entertainment, raised-fist political rally, and stand-up spiritual revival” characteristic of the post-Civil Rights, Vietnam era movement, writes the PBS description of Wattstax. Unfortunately, the documentary “was considered too racy, political, and black to receive wide theatrical release or television broadcast” despite a “noted” Cannes screening and a 1974 Golden Globe nomination. It’s been a cult favorite for years, but deserves to be more widely seen, as a record of the hope and celebration of black America after the rage and despair of the late-60s. The messages of Wattstax still resonate. As Bell says, “forty years later, I hear African Americans in the audiences reacting the same scenes, the same way they did forty years ago.”

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Joan Baez sings Bob Dylan (20 Songs – Full Album)

Joan Baez

Joan Baez – Vanguard Sessions – Baez Sings Dylan – 1998

01 Love Minus Zero-No Limit 0:00
02 It’s All over Now, Baby Blue. 2:43
03 You Ain’t Going Nowhere. 6:09
04 It Ain’t Me Babe. 9:11
05 I Pity the Poor Immigrant. 12:32
06 Tears of Rage. 16:20
07 Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word 20:44
08 I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine 25:12
09 Farewell, Angelina 28:29
10 Dear Landlord 31:45
11 One Too Many Mornings 34:46
12 I Shall Be Released 38:00
13 Boots of Spanish Leather 41:58
14 Daddy You’ve Been on My Mind 46:32
15 Restless Farewell 48:50
16 Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right 54:43
17 Walls of Red Wing 57:56
18 Drifter’s Escape 1:01:49
19 Walkin’ Down the Line 1:04:44
20 North Country Blues 1:08:08

BILL WITHERS LIVE AT THE BBC, 1973 (FULL CONCERT)

BILL WITHERS

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You might also enjoy:

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BILL WITHERS, The Essential (2 CDs) 
DOWLOAD TORRENT

CD1
01 – Better Days (Theme from Man and Boy).mp3
02 – Ain’t No Sunshine.mp3
03 – Harlem.mp3
04 – Grandma’s Hands.mp3
05 – Hope She’ll Be Happier.mp3
06 – Better Off Dead.mp3
07 – Lonely Town, Lonely Street.mp3
08 – Let Me in Your Life.mp3
09 – Who Is He (And What Is He to You).mp3
10 – Use Me.mp3

CD2
01 – Family Table.mp3
02 – The Best You Can.mp3
03 – Hello Like Before.mp3
04 – I Wish You Well.mp3
05 – Don’t You Want to Stay.mp3
06 – I’ll Be With You.mp3
07 – My Imagination.mp3
08 – Lovely Day.mp3
09 – I Want to Spend the Night.mp3
10 – Tender Things.mp3

DOWLOAD TORRENT

 

ROBERT JOHNSON: A mythic figure of the Blues (Listen to his Complete Recs and covers by Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Howlin Wolf, Cream, R.L. Burnside, Gil Scott-Heron and others…)

R J

Artist Biography by Cub Koda

If the blues has a truly mythic figure, one whose story hangs over the music the way a Charlie Parker does over jazz or a Hank Williams does over country, it’s Robert Johnson, certainly the most celebrated figure in the history of the blues. Of course, his legend is immensely fortified by the fact that Johnson also left behind a small legacy of recordings that are considered the emotional apex of the music itself. These recordings have not only entered the realm of blues standards (“Love in Vain,” “Crossroads,” “Sweet Home Chicago,” “Stop Breaking Down”), but were adapted by rock & roll artists as diverse as the Rolling Stones, Steve Miller, Led Zeppelin, and Eric Clapton. While there are historical naysayers who would be more comfortable downplaying his skills and achievements (most of whom have never made a convincing case as where the source of his apocalyptic visions emanates from), Robert Johnson remains a potent force to be reckoned with. As a singer, a composer, and as a guitarist of considerable skills, he produced some of the genre’s best music and the ultimate blues legend to deal with. Doomed, haunted, driven by demons, a tormented genius dead at an early age, all of these add up to making him a character of mythology who — if he hadn’t actually existed — would have to be created by some biographer’s overactive romantic imagination.

The legend of his life — which by now, even folks who don’t know anything about the blues can cite to you chapter and verse — goes something like this: Robert Johnson was a young black man living on a plantation in rural Mississippi. Branded with a burning desire to become great blues musician, he was instructed to take his guitar to a crossroad near Dockery’s plantation at midnight. There he was met by a large black man (the Devil) who took the guitar from Johnson, tuned it, and handed it back to him. Within less than a year’s time, in exchange for his everlasting soul,Robert Johnson became the king of the Delta blues singers, able to play, sing, and create the greatest blues anyone had ever heard.

As success came with live performances and phonograph recordings, Johnson remained tormented, constantly haunted by nightmares of hellhounds on his trail, his pain and mental anguish finding release only in the writing and performing of his music. Just as he was to be brought to Carnegie Hall to perform in John Hammond’s first Spirituals to Swing concert, the news had come from Mississippi; Robert Johnson was dead, poisoned by a jealous girlfriend while playing a jook joint. Those who were there swear he was last seen alive foaming at the mouth, crawling around on all fours, hissing and snapping at onlookers like a mad dog. His dying words (either spoken or written on a piece of scrap paper) were, “I pray that my redeemer will come and take me from my grave.” He was buried in a pine box in an unmarked grave, his deal with the Devil at an end. – KEEP ON READIN AT AMG ALL MUSIC GUIDE

Robert Johnson’s blues played by other stunning artists:

 

Jeff Buckley (1966-1997) LIVE! Two videos of full concerts, one in Frankfurt, Germany, in 1995, the other “Live in Chicago” DVD [watch on-line / download]

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Remember Jeff’s studio recs (audio only – full albums):

Other live ones:

Documentaries:

Robert Crumb’s Heroes of Blues, Jazz & Country (Full Album)

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Take a ride down memory lane and remember some blues, country and jazz recordings selected by Mr. Robert Crumb. A precious compilation!

Song list:

01. Memphis Jug Band – On The Road Again
02. Blind Willie Mctell – Dark Night Blues
03. Cannon’s Jug Stompers – Minglewood Blues
04. Skip James – Hard Time Killin’ Floor Blues
05. Jaybird Coleman – I’m Gonna Cross The River Of Jordan ΓÇô Some O’ These Days
06. Charley Patton – High Water Everywhere
07. Frank Stokes – I Got Mine
08. Dock Boggs – Sugar Baby
09. Shelor Family – Big Bend Gal
10. Hayes Shepherd – The Peddler And His Wife
11. Crockett’s Kentucky Mountaineers – Little Rabbit
12. Burnett & Rutherford – All Night Long Blues
13. East Texas Serenaders – Mineola Rag
14. Weems String Band – Greenback Dollar
15. Bennie Moten’s Kansas City Orchestra – Kater Street Rag
16. King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band – Sobbin’ Blues
17. Parham-Pickett Apollo Syncopaters – Mojo Strut
18. Frankie Franko And His Louisianians – Somebody Stole My Gal
19. Clarence Williams’ Blue Five – Wild Cat Blues
20. Jelly Roll Morton & His Red Hot Peppers – Kansas City Stomps
21. Jimmy Noone – King Joe

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