“Forever Changes” (1967), by Love, a classic gem of the Sixties Psychedelic scene in L.A.

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Cheers, fellow earthlings! Here’s one of the greatest musical journeys of the Sixties and certainy one of my favorite albums from the “Hippie” era, Love’s Forever Changes. Read an excellent review by Mark Deming and then pump up the volume and press play to trip through this entrancing soundscapes!…

“Love’s Forever Changes made only a minor dent on the charts when it was first released in 1967, but years later it became recognized as one of the finest and most haunting albums to come out of the Summer of Love, which doubtless has as much to do with the disc’s themes and tone as the music, beautiful as it is. Sharp electric guitars dominated most of Love’s first two albums, and they make occasional appearances here on tunes like “A House Is Not a Motel” and “Live and Let Live,” but most of Forever Changes is built around interwoven acoustic guitar textures and subtle orchestrations, with strings and horns both reinforcing and punctuating the melodies. The punky edge of Love’s early work gave way to a more gentle, contemplative, and organic sound on Forever Changes, but while Arthur Lee and Bryan MacLean wrote some of their most enduring songs for the album, the lovely melodies and inspired arrangements can’t disguise an air of malaise that permeates the sessions. A certain amount of this reflects the angst of a group undergoing some severe internal strife, but Forever Changes is also an album that heralds the last days of a golden age and anticipates the growing ugliness that would dominate the counterculture in 1968 and 1969; images of violence and war haunt “A House Is Not a Motel,” the street scenes of “Maybe the People Would Be the Times or Between Clark and Hillsdale” reflects a jaded mindset that flower power could not ease, the twin specters of race and international strife rise to the surface of “The Red Telephone,” romance becomes cynicism in “Bummer in the Summer,” the promise of the psychedelic experience decays into hard drug abuse in “Live and Let Live,” and even gentle numbers like “Andmoreagain” and “Old Man” sound elegiac, as if the ghosts of Chicago and Altamont were visible over the horizon as Love looked back to brief moments of warmth. Forever Changes is inarguably Love’s masterpiece and an album of enduring beauty, but it’s also one of the few major works of its era that saw the dark clouds looming on the cultural horizon, and the result was music that was as prescient as it was compelling.” – MARK DENING

Side A
1. Alone again or 00:00
2. A house is not a motel 03:16
3. Andmoreagain 06:48
4. The daily planet 10:06
5. Old man 13:38
6. The red telephone 16:40

Side B
1. Maybe the people would be the times or between Clark and Hilldale 21:31
2. Live and let live 25:05
3. The good humor man, he sees everything like this 30:32
4. Bummer in the summer 33:40
5. You set the scene 36:04

Jazz & Blues Classics – 60s and 70s – 1st Edition (exclusive material!)

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“Music, the greatest good that mortals know,
And all of heaven we have below.”
JOSEPH ADDISON (1672-1719)

For all of you who cherish and praise  M U S I C, and deem it one greatest goods that mortals know here below, here it comes: some classic yet obscure albums from the 60s and 70s. They weren’t available at Youtube yet, so I took the trouble to upload them and share them with you – and let’s just hope these precious digital music-boxes don’t get labeled piracy and erased from the public stream.

So, here’s three of the records who’ve been getting a lot of airplay in my mind and ears lately: Alexis Korner, the great british bluesman and talented guitarist, who in the early sixties was inspirational to Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, among others; Oliver Nelson, with his debut album Screaming’ The Blues, released in 1960 and containing some of the most exciting and compelling sax sound ever to be commited to tape; and Lonnie Liston Smith‘s Expansions, a masterpiece of fusion and funk-jazz in the Seventies, in which Lonnie Liston Smith, who had previously played with masters such as Miles Davis, Pharaoh Sanders and Roland Kirk, flies with his own band into the skies – and brings back to earth what Addison tought to be “all of heaven we have below”.

Enjoy the music!