Rest in Peace, Mr. Jack Bruce (1943-2014): Your Music Lives On!

Cream

CREAM

JACK BRUCE (1943-2014)

Artist Biography by Richard Skelly

Songs for a TailorAlthough some may be tempted to call multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, and composer Jack Bruce a rock & roll musician, blues and jazz were what this innovative musician really loved. As a result, those two genres were at the base of most of the recorded output from a career that went back to the beginning of London’s blues scene in 1962. In that year, he joined Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated. Throughout the following decades and into the 21st century, Bruce remained a supreme innovator, pushing himself into uncharted waters with his jazz and folk-rock compositions.

Bruce‘s most famous songs were, in essence, blues tunes — “Sunshine of Your Love,” “Strange Brew,” “Politician,” “White Room” — and they were ones he penned for Cream, the legendary blues-rock trio he formed with drummer Ginger Baker and guitarist Eric Clapton in July 1966. Baker and Bruceplayed together for five years before Clapton came along, and although their trio only lasted until November 1968, the group is credited with changing the face of rock & roll and bringing blues to a worldwide audience. Through their creative arrangements of classic blues tunes like Robert Johnson‘s “Crossroads,” Skip James‘ “I’m So Glad,” Willie Dixon‘s “Spoonful,” and Albert King‘s “Born Under a Bad Sign,” the group helped popularize blues-rock and led the way for similar groups that came about later on, like Led Zeppelin.

Bruce was born May 14, 1943, in Lanarkshire, near Glasgow, Scotland. His father was a big jazz fan, and so he included people like Louis Armstrong and Fats Waller among his earliest influences. He grew up listening to jazz and took up bass and cello as a teen. After three months at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, he left, disgusted with the politics of music school. After traveling around Europe for a while, he settled into the early blues scene in 1962 in London, where he eventually met drummerGinger Baker. He played with British blues pioneers Alexis Korner and Graham Bond before leaving in 1965 to join John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, whose guitarist was Eric Clapton. This gave him time to get his chops together without having to practice. With Manfred Mann, who he also played with before forming Cream, Bruce learned about the business of making hit songs.

Shadows in the AirCream‘s reputation for long, extended blues jams began at the Fillmore in San Francisco at a concert organized by impresario Bill Graham. Bruce later realized that Creamgave him a chance to succeed as a musician, and admitted that if it weren’t for that group, he might never have escaped London. After Cream split up in November 1968, Bruceformed Jack Bruce & Friends with drummer Mitch Mitchell and guitarist Larry Coryell. Recording-wise, Bruce took a different tack away from blues and blues-rock, leaning more in a folk-rock direction with his solo albums Songs for a Tailor (1969), Harmony Row (1971), and Out of the Storm(1974).

Live at the MilkywayIn 2010, Bruce joined the Tony Williams Lifetime Tribute Band with Reid, organist John Medeski, and drummer Cindy Blackman, and toured in the late part of that year and in early 2011 to sold-out performances and rave reviews. Also in 2011, Pledge Music, a company that pairs fans and artists to fund projects, released Jack Bruce and the Cuicoland Express Live at the Milky Way, from a 2001 concert in Amsterdam. The high-quality recording was provided by Bruce‘s daughters, who designed the cover as well. The Lifetime Tribute Band’s tour had been so successful that the group renamed itself Spectrum Road and entered the studio. They emerged with a self-titled album that featured covers of Lifetime material and originals. In 2013, Bruce reconvened the rhythm section under his name for the album Silver Rails (with Robin Trower, Phil Manzanera, Uli Jon Roth, and Bernie Marsdenalternating in the guitar chair). It was released in March of 2014. Just seven months later, however, he died at his Suffolk home from liver disease.”






 

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Pump up the volume & watch Jeff Buckley’s full concert in Chicago, 1995. What an awe-inspiring musician!

Chicago

Live at Cabaret Metro in Chicago is a live DVD by Jeff Buckley, recorded on May 13, 1995 at Cabaret Metro during the Mystery White Boy tour.

Tracks:

  • “Dream Brother” (Jeff Buckley, Mick Grondahl, Matt Johnson)
  • “Lover, You Should’ve Come Over” (Jeff Buckley)
  • “Mojo Pin” (Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas)
  • “So Real” (Jeff Buckley, Michael Tighe)
  • “Last Goodbye” (Jeff Buckley)
  • “Eternal Life (Jeff Buckley)
  • “Kick Out the Jams” (MC5)
  • “Lilac Wine” (James Shelton)
  • “What Will You Say” (Jeff Buckley, Carla Azar, Chris Dowd)
  • “Grace” (Jeff Buckley, Gary Lucas)
  • “Vancouver” (instrumental) (Jeff Buckley, Mick Grondahl, Michael Tighe)
  • “Kanga Roo” (Big Star)
  • “Hallelujah” (Leonard Cohen)

Bonus material (click links below to watch)

Personnel:

Jeff Buckley – vocals, guitar
Michael Tighe – guitar
Mick Grondahl – bass guitar
Matt Johnson – drums

BBC’s “1959: The Year That Changed Jazz” (Full Documentary – Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Charlie Mingus, Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane etc.)

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Four landmark Jazz albums from 1959:

1


2

4

3

Masterpieces of Jazz: John Handy’s “Hard Work” (6:56)

HARD WORK (John Handy)
Recorded January 1976 at ABC Studios, Los Angeles.
Released on the LP Hard Work (Impulse).

John Handy: alto saxophone, vocals
Hotep Cecil Barnard: electric keyboard
Mike Hoffman: electric guitar
Chuch Rainey: electric bass
Eddie Bongo Brown: congas
James Gadson: drums.

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You might also enjoy:

The Greatest Albums of 2014 – 1st Edition – TEMPLES, “Sun Structures”

 

Temples

TEMPLESSun Structures (2014)

Psychedelic Rock / UK
MP3 – 320 kbps
00:52:55

“After a steady build up of stateside buzz and support, Kettering, England’s favorite psychedelic sons Temples are announcing their debut full-length, Sun Structures, out February 11th on Fat Possum. It’s a record that’s destined to set out the band’s stall as Britain’s premier retro-futurists, with influences ranging from ’60s psychedelia to Motown, glam, and Krautrock, all viewed through a very modern kaleidoscope – and always keeping the song at the heart of it all. Recorded in the box-room of guitarist/vocalist James Bagshaw’s home, the aim was “Jack Nitzsche on a DIY budget,” and with one listen to first single off the record, “Mesmerize,” it’s pretty clear that they’ve succeeded.” – Read the whole bio at Fat Possum

Tracklist
01 – Shelter Song [00:03:10]
02 – Sun Structures [00:05:13]
03 – The Golden Throne [00:04:10]
04 – Keep In The Dark [00:04:36]
05 – Mesmerise [00:03:42]
06 – Move With The Season [00:05:10]
07 – Colours To Life [00:05:11]
08 – A Question Isn’t Answered [00:05:11]
09 – The Guesser [00:04:06]
10 – Test Of Time [00:03:53]
11 – Sand Dance [00:06:31]
12 – Fragment’s Light [00:01:57]

TEMPLES_JF_0007Here’s what Toronto’s NOW Magazine wrote about them:

“It would be easy to write off Temples as retro-loving hippies who likely don’t own any records released later than 1969. Their recent singles teem with kaleidoscopic psychedelia and Beatles harmonies, and their November set at the Horseshoe was too brief to show much well-roundedness. Their velvet blazers, turtlenecks and wild hair, meanwhile, only added to the throwback vibe.

What a surprise, then, that not only does the Kettering, England, four-piece’s debut album give us close to an hour of music, but, like Tame Impala records, it delivers retro influences through an overwhelmingly modern filter. Temples have been called “production-obsessed,” and their attention to detail comes through in the dense but sensitive layers of cosmic effects, groovy rhythms and oh-so-hooky melodies.

The songwriting is outstanding: striking and smart, concise and full, and James Bagshaw sings superbly throughout. The Golden Throne sounds a bit like caper film music. The bong-worthy A Question Isn’t Answered and Sand Dance bring in Eastern influences, while Keep In The Dark is buoyant psychedelic pop.”

http://www.nowtoronto.com/music/story.cfm?content=196551

Jazz & Blues Classics – 60s and 70s – 1st Edition (exclusive material!)

blues2011

“Music, the greatest good that mortals know,
And all of heaven we have below.”
JOSEPH ADDISON (1672-1719)

For all of you who cherish and praise  M U S I C, and deem it one greatest goods that mortals know here below, here it comes: some classic yet obscure albums from the 60s and 70s. They weren’t available at Youtube yet, so I took the trouble to upload them and share them with you – and let’s just hope these precious digital music-boxes don’t get labeled piracy and erased from the public stream.

So, here’s three of the records who’ve been getting a lot of airplay in my mind and ears lately: Alexis Korner, the great british bluesman and talented guitarist, who in the early sixties was inspirational to Clapton, Jeff Beck, Jimmy Page, among others; Oliver Nelson, with his debut album Screaming’ The Blues, released in 1960 and containing some of the most exciting and compelling sax sound ever to be commited to tape; and Lonnie Liston Smith‘s Expansions, a masterpiece of fusion and funk-jazz in the Seventies, in which Lonnie Liston Smith, who had previously played with masters such as Miles Davis, Pharaoh Sanders and Roland Kirk, flies with his own band into the skies – and brings back to earth what Addison tought to be “all of heaven we have below”.

Enjoy the music!

Rock’n’Roll Ain’t Noise Pollution! [MIXTAPE – 13 tracks]

01. THE BEATLES, “Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End”
02. THE WHO, “The Seeker”
03. LED ZEPPELIN, “Gallows Pole”
04. THE KNICKERBOXERS, “Lies”
05. THE SONICS, “Strychnine”
06. THE REMAINS, “Don’t Look Back”
07. CHOCOLATE WATCHBAND, “Are You Gonna Be There”
08. THE STANDELLS, “Dirty Water”
09. THE COUNT FIVE, “Psychotic Reactions”
10. LOVE, “7 and 7 Is”
11. ELECTRIC PRUNES, “I Had Too Much To Dream Last Nite”
12. THE STRANGELOVES, “Night Time”
13. JIMI HENDRIX, “Foxy Lady”