Simon Critchley and Cornel West in Conversation at BAM

Simon Critchley and Cornel West in Conversation.

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Cornel West interviewed by Avi Lewis @ Al Jazeera’s Fault Lines (25 min)

Justice is Love in Public

He was the first African-American to get a PhD in philosophy at Princeton.

He went on to write more than 20 books, receive more than 20 honourary degrees, to teach at Harvard and Yale, and hold classes at universities from Paris to Addis Abeba.

With his latest hip hop CD he was named “MTV’s artist of the week”, and he has provided futuristic philosophical commentary on all three Matrix movies.

In a famous spat with the then president of Harvard University he called Lawrence Summers “the Ariel Sharon of higher education.”

Avi Lewis talks to Cornel West, a professor of African American Studies at Princeton, hip hop artist, and one of the most controversial academics in the US, about the state of democracy for African-Americans today, the Obama administration, and his dispute with Lawrence Summers.

He also shares his views on US foreign policy, the war in Afghanistan, global recession, and the growing pressure on Barack Obama.

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See all episodes of Fault Lines: http://www.youtube.com/show/faultlines
Meet the Fault Lines Team: http://aje.me/ZhfAbH

“EXAMINED LIFE – PHILOSOPHY IS IN THE STREETS” (awesome doc!)

ExaminedLife_DVD

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”
—Socrates

Examined Life pulls philosophy out of academic journals and classrooms, and puts it back on the streets

In Examined Life, filmmaker Astra Taylor accompanies some of today’s most influential thinkers on a series of unique excursions through places and spaces that hold particular resonance for them and their ideas. Peter Singer’s thoughts on the ethics of consumption are amplified against the backdrop of Fifth Avenue’s posh boutiques. Slavoj Zizek questions current beliefs about the environment while sifting through a garbage dump. Michael Hardt ponders the nature of revolution while surrounded by symbols of wealth and leisure. Judith Butler and a friend stroll through San Francisco’s Mission District questioning our culture’s fixation on individualism. And while driving through Manhattan, Cornel West—perhaps America’s best-known public intellectual—compares philosophy to jazz and blues, reminding us how intense and invigorating a life of the mind can be. Offering privileged moments with great thinkers from fields ranging from moral philosophy to cultural theory, Examined Life reveals philosophy’s power to transform the way we see the world around us and imagine our place in it. Featuring Cornel West, Avital Ronell, Peter Singer, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Hardt, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor. – Zeitgeist Films

Watch Examined Life:


Download

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Other documentaries previously posted at A.W. that you might enjoy:

Speaking Truth to Power & Other Worthwhile Civil Disobediences (#NousSommesTousPalestiniens)

London 09 08

London, UK. August 9th, 2014. An estimated multitude of 150.000 marches in solidarity with the Palestinian people. Israel’s war crimes in Gaza have sparked massive demonstrations in several cities worldwide. Read BBC’s article. Follow the Facebook page Palestine Solidarity Campaign UK.

Cheers, fellow earthlings!

alice walkerMrs. Alice Walker, author of the highly acclaimed novel The Color Purple (winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and filmed by Steven Spielberg), hits the nail on the head when she says: “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”

I’ve been thinking a lot about that wonderful phrase lately, especially after “witnessing” the latest events in Gaza. From a distance, here in Toronto, I followed the news with an inner feeling of powerless outrage. “So many people are afraid to speak at all”, said Mrs. Walker to Amy Goodman in the WebTVshow Democracy Now, “and I think this is very dangerous. Wherever there’s oppresion, wherever you see people being humiliated, it’s our duty as human beings and citizens of the planet to speak. If that’s all you can do… speak, at least!” 

The streets of several cities, all around the world, are shouting out: “enough is enough!” Israel’s genocidal practices against the Palestinians must end, and those allies who sell weapons of mass destruction for the State’s politics of racist Sionism, murderous islamophobia and militarily-imposed Apartheid should be aware: thousands of us, citizens of global Civil Society, won’t take it anymore.

We can’t allow ourselves to believe in our own powerlessness, to feel beat -own and out-of-strenght to oppose high-collar criminals, or else we’re lost – and genocide will happen again. As Mrs. Rosi Brandotti says, we have to join our voices in a global chorus that states: “we organize, we don’t only agonize!” In apathy we’ll drown, in empathy we’ll rise!

 Mrs. Walker and Mrs Roy, together:

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Children

UNICEF: The conflict in Gaza has killed more than 400 children and injured over 2,500. Thousands more suffered trauma and will need psychosocial support. Pernille Ironside, Chief of UNICEF’s Field Office in Gaza describes the “catastrophic and tragic impact” that this war is having on children: uni.cf/1pCl5NA via The New York Times.

From the United Nations "Gaza Crisis Appeal" - Download the full document. http://bit.ly/1spNBD7

From the United Nations’ “Gaza Crisis Appeal” – Download the full document. http://bit.ly/1spNBD7

Unfortunately, the most common discovery we make when genocide and ethnical cleansing are being commited is that we are unable to stop them. We lament after human lives have already been slaughtered, and during the slaughter we feel unable to create an effective obstacle in the way of the murderers. Methinks it’s a healthy symptom of empathy to experience sadness and grief for the thousands of victims of Israel’s heinous crimes – more than 400 hundred children killed; half a million people displaced; bombardments of hospitals, schools, universities, UN-shelters etc. But it would be unhealthy and unworthy to do only that. We may lament and cry over the spilt milk (or, rather, the spilt blood), but now action needs to be taken collectively in order that such horrors don’t happen again.

Hundreds of thousands of us spoke out in solidarity with Gaza. Thousands marched in the streets all around the world. Thousands more shared their indignation on social media and on the Blogosphere, made independent documentaries and photo essays. More than ever, I think we should as Jello Biafra likes to suggest: “don’t hate the media, become the media.” Considering the warmongers, profit-seeking sharks, ecocidal maniacs and trigger-hapy genocidal leaders who are currently in power, shouldn’t we speak out  as loud as we can? Will we let the powerful keep on getting away with the genocide of the powerless, with the murderous politics of Apartheid? Will the world accept silently the Guernica-like bombardment of the civil population of Gaza, for instance?

More than ever, I cherish these voices – such as Alice Waker’s or Arundathi Roy’s or Cornel West’s or Tariq Ali’s – who not only speak out for the powerless and for the crushed, defending the fundamental humanity of those treated by Power as subhumans or pests. It’s fundamental that we amplify and ressonate these voices who speak-out, shouting Truth into Power’s half-deaf ears, putting their words in the service of those who have been silenced. Simone Weil knew: it’s an optimistic lie to believe that love can’t be crushed by force, by violence, by mad strenght. It can. But we mustn’t let the hateful forces of bloody antagonism keep on winning over peace, love & empathy.

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Recommended further reading:

The Case

“Provides clear arguments for international sanctions against Israel because of its treatment of the Palestinians. This excellent collection of essays is an essential text for anyone interested in why they should support the movement to boycott Israel. The essays are not just good reading; they are also an eloquent call to the world to give a damn.” – Ron Jacobs, CounterPunch (official) – DOWNLOAD FREE EBOOK

“For decades, Israel has denied Palestinians their fundamental rights of freedom, equality, and self-determination through ethnic cleansing, colonization, racial discrimination, and military occupation. Despite abundant condemnation of Israeli policies by the UN, other international bodies, and preeminent human rights organisations, the world community has failed to hold Israel accountable and enforce compliance with basic principles of law. Israel’s crimes have continued with impunity.

In view of this continued failure, Palestinian civil society called for a global citizens’ response. On July 9 2005, a year after the International Court of Justice’s historic advisory opinion on the illegality of Israel’s Wall in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT), a clear majority of Palestinian civil society called upon their counterparts and people of conscience all over the world to launch broad boycotts, implement divestment initiatives, and to demand sanctions against Israel, until Palestinian rights are recognised in full compliance with international law.

The campaign for boycotts, divestment and sanctions (BDS) is shaped by a rights-based approach and highlights the three broad sections of the Palestinian people: the refugees, those under military occupation in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and Palestinians in Israel. The call urges various forms of boycott against Israel until it meets its obligations under international law by:

  • Ending its occupation and colonization of all Arab lands occupied in June 1967 and dismantling the Wall;
  • Recognizing the fundamental rights of the Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel to full equality; and
  • Respecting, protecting and promoting the rights of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes and properties as stipulated in UN Resolution 19

The BDS call was endorsed by over 170 Palestinian political parties, organizations, trade unions and movements. The signatories represent the refugees, Palestinians in the OPT, and Palestinian citizens of Israel.

Boycotts target products and companies (Israeli and international) that profit from the violation of Palestinian rights, as well as Israeli sporting, cultural and academic institutions. Anyone can boycott Israeli goods, simply by making sure that they don’t buy produce made in Israel or by Israeli companies. Campaigners and groups call on consumers not to buy Israeli goods and on businesses not to buy or sell them.

Israeli cultural and academic institutions directly contribute to maintaining, defending or whitewashing the oppression of Palestinians, as Israel deliberately tries to boost its image internationally through academic and cultural collaborations. As part of the boycott, academics, artists and consumers are campaigning against such collaboration and ‘rebranding’. A growing number of artists have refused to exhibit or play in Israel.

Divestment means targeting corporations complicit in the violation of Palestinian rights and ensuring that the likes of university investment portfolios and pension funds are not used to finance such companies. These efforts raise awareness about the reality of Israel’s policies and encourage companies to use their economic influence to pressure Israel to end its systematic denial of Palestinian rights.

Sanctions are an essential part of demonstrating disapproval for a country’s actions. Israel’s membership of various diplomatic and economic forums provides both an unmerited veneer of respectability and material support for its crimes. By calling for sanctions against Israel, campaigners educate society about violations of international law and seek to end the complicity of other nations in these violations.”

Source: The BDS National Committee
http://www.bdsmovement.net/bdsintro

 

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From the streets of Montréal, Québec:
“Nous Sommes Tous Palestiniens”  (subtitles in English)

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The Case for Cultural & Academic Boycott of Israel with intro by Ken Loach

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See also the statements made by Noam Chomsky, Brian Eno, Cornel West, Tariq Ali.

TO BE CONTINUED…

Judith Butler & Cornel West – Honoring Edward Said

Cornel West
Judith Butler 2
A highly interesting and thought-provoking conversation between Judith Butler and Cornel West, honoring the life and work of Edward Said on the 10th anniversary of his death. Check it out:

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Recommended further reading:

Cornel West @ Examined Life (A film by Astra Taylor)

Cornel West“I’m a bluesman in the life of the mind…” – Cornel West

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Examined

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”
—Socrates

Examined Life pulls philosophy out of academic journals and classrooms, and puts it back on the streets…

In Examined Life, filmmaker Astra Taylor accompanies some of today’s most influential thinkers on a series of unique excursions through places and spaces that hold particular resonance for them and their ideas.

Peter Singer’s thoughts on the ethics of consumption are amplified against the backdrop of Fifth Avenue’s posh boutiques. Slavoj Zizek questions current beliefs about the environment while sifting through a garbage dump. Michael Hardt ponders the nature of revolution while surrounded by symbols of wealth and leisure. Judith Butler and a friend stroll through San Francisco’s Mission District questioning our culture’s fixation on individualism. And while driving through Manhattan, Cornel West—perhaps America’s best-known public intellectual—compares philosophy to jazz and blues, reminding us how intense and invigorating a life of the mind can be. Offering privileged moments with great thinkers from fields ranging from moral philosophy to cultural theory, Examined Life reveals philosophy’s power to transform the way we see the world around us and imagine our place in it.

Featuring Cornel West, Avital Ronell, Peter Singer, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Hardt, Slavoj Zizek, Judith Butler and Sunaura Taylor.

– Zeitgeist Films

“Égalité for All: Toussaint L’Overture and the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804)” – Full PBS Documentary, 55 min, 2009, HD

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“It was the only successful slave insurrection in history. It grasped the full meaning of French revolutionary ideas — liberté, equalité, fraternité — and used them to create the world’s first Black republic. It changed the trajectory of colonial economics. “It” was the Haitian Revolution, a movement that’s been called the true birth moment of universal human rights. Vaguely remembered today, the Haitian Revolution was a hurricane at the turn of the nineteenth century — traumatizing Southern planters and inspiring slaves and abolitionists, worldwide.

The man at the forefront of Haiti’s epochal uprising was Toussaint Louverture. He was world-known in his day and deserves a place among history’s most celebrated figures today. Born into slavery, Toussaint had been freed by his master before the revolt began. He owned property and was financially secure. He risked it all, however, to join then lead an army of slaves that would fight, in turn, the French, the British, and the Spanish empires for twelve years…

The story of Haiti’s revolution is a story of extraordinary pathos. Half a million slaves dared hope for an unprecedented end to slavery and thousands died in the process. But the revolution’s history is also a story of forgotten people and milestones. Haitian slaves did not just fight with weapons. In 1794 a multi-racial delegation from Haiti traveled to Paris to address the national assembly. They spoke powerfully about slavery’s moral and physical violence. They argued that their struggle was part of France’s domestic revolution against despotism. And they won the day. The elocution of Haitian Blacks led to a sudden decree that not only freed the empire’s entire slave population, it made them French citizens, too.

Égalité for All: Toussaint Louverture and the Haitian Revolution explores this history through music, voodoo ritual, powerful re-creations, and insightful writers and historians.” – PBS Synopsis

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You might also like:

Haitian Revolution – Toussaint L’Overture on Vimeo.

Toussaint L’Ouverture was the leader of the Haitian Revolution (1794-1804) against the French. Haiti was the first black republic and the second independent modern nation in the Western Hemisphere. Through the illustrations of paintings by Jacob Lawrence and Edouard Duval-Carrie, among others, the re-enactment of the lasts days of Toussaint L’Ouverture and the story of the Haitian Revolution unfolds. This film features actors Danny Glover as narrator and Glenn Plummer in the role of Toussaint, interviews with Dr. Cornel West and Wyclef Jean (who also composed original music). Created for the Museum of the African Diaspora. All rights and permissions belong to the museum.